Thursday, May 22, 2014

Safety in (Recall) Numbers

The recall of a car seems to be a "damned if you do, damned if you don't" kind of proposition.

General Motors is recalling cars almost as fast as they're making them, but what is worse---recalling cars or ignoring the problem?

If anyone knows both sides of that sword, it's GM.

Nearly 14 million GM cars have been recalled in 2014, and the year isn't half over.

The latest mulligan for General Motors is the Chevy Aveo, which the other day became the 30th GM vehicle to be recalled in 2014. The 218,000 subcompact Aveos brought the grand total of recalled GM cars to 13.8 million.

The latest recall involves Aveos in model years between 2004 and 2008. The daytime running light module in the dashboard center stack can overheat, melt and catch fire.

Of course, nothing is worse than a recall born out of deaths, and GM knows all about that, too---with its infamous ignition switch debacle from earlier this year that is responsible for at least 13 deaths (according to GM; suing lawyers say the number is 53).

No injuries or deaths have been reported as yet in connection with the Aveo recall.

Yes, recalling nearly 14 million cars isn't the greatest thing for consumer confidence, but neither is under-reporting or non-reporting problems, as might have been the case with the ignition switch thing.

General Motors, which at one time was among the largest and most robust companies in the entire world, has been, to use an appropriate analogy, spinning its wheels in 2014.

The ignition switch problem, which may have gone on for about 10 years before GM did anything about it, is costing the company $35 million in fines.

But again, what is worse---recall or looking the other way?

I'm reminded of the restaurant that is cited for a slew of health violations and is then host for high profile dignitaries after the problems have been addressed, to supposedly prove how safe it is.

Well, of course it's safe! A restaurant coming off health violations ought to be the safest in town, don't you think?

Maybe GM cars will soon be among the safest on the road, seeing as they are being built under hawk-like eyes these days.

Regardless, the question begs: why so many recalls in 2014?

Jeff Boyer, GM's new safety czar, recently told the media that the ignition switch problem led GM to look at a slew of safety issues with its vehicles, and that begat the spate of recalls.

Makes sense.

Make that, dollars and cents.

So far in 2014, GM is on the hook for $1.7 billion in recall-related charges.

That's a lot of dough, but the loss of business already incurred due to the ignition switch mess is incalculable. How do you measure the number of folks who won't buy your cars?

GM is taking its safety concerns as seriously as ever these days. Boyer, for one, holds the title of vice president, and that's a first in the area of safety for GM.

My parents used to own GM cars only, because my father worked for the company. Now we own Fords, because my mother is a retiree.

But in comparing the two, I can only report from personal experience that I have had good luck with both GM and Ford cars. My 1986 Chevy Cavalier, for example, was driven hard for six years, racking up nearly 150,000 miles. It was still kicking when we traded it in for our 1992 Mustang.

The Mustang, for its part, is 22 years old and is still running.

So there.

It's been a tough year at GM for many reasons, but at least no one can say that the cars rolling off the assembly lines these days are being given the bum rush.

And isn't the bum rush what consumers don't want from their automakers?

1 comment:

As you will...